vermicomposters.com

Vermicomposting, worm bin, composting with worms community and forums

So i just recently started making worm tea, i made a brewer (aka Oxygen Saturater [my name for it]) which i will post a pic of on my page for people to look at.

Anyways, i was wondering what recipes some of you use, and how well they work.

My recipe so far:

5 ounces of Vermicompost

2 ounces of Molasses

and ~4 gallons of Water (left out in sun for 24 hours to let chlorine evaporate)

Views: 2639

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Check out this site.

http://www.microbeorganics.com/

Here's a snip:

FOR A 50 Gallon Brew.

A/ Recipe for a Diversity of Microbes; Nutrient Cycling 
- measurements do not need to be precise; expressed in different units in brackets.

*compost/vermicompost – 2.38% max. (4.5 liters), (19 cups US), (4.5 quarts US) – reduce as required according to brewer and water quality

*unsulphured pure black strap molasses - I recommend using 0.50% (just under 1 liter), (4 cups US) (1 quart US) [but you can use a maximum 0.75% (1.4 liters), (5.9 cups US), (1.4 quarts US)] – reduce as required according to brewer and water quality

*fish hydrolysate(high quality) - 0.063% - (120 ml); (4 ounces)
Do not use chemically deodorized liquid fish!

*kelp meal - 0.25% max. (0.5 liter or 500 ml), (17 ounces US), (0.5 quart US), (2 plus cups) 
NOTE: This is a maximum amount of kelp and you can experiment using less. This is using regular grade kelp meal for livestock. If you have soluble kelp, I recommend using smaller amounts. Sometimes kelp meal can initially delay bacterial multiplication.

*soft rock phosphate granules/powder - 0.063% - (120 ml) (4 ounces), (0.5 cup)
We grind up the granules into a powder with a coffee grinder

Length of Brew;
This will provide a CT with a microbial content of, bacteria/archaea and fungal hyphae (if present in compost) when brewed for 18 to 24 hours. When using our fungal inhabited vermicompost, the optimum time seems to be 18 hours for a bacteria/archaea and fungal brew. If brewed for 30 to 36 hours (and up to 42 to 48 hours if you have a microscope) there will be flagellates and amoebae (& some ciliates) as well, providing a functioning microbial consortia which is better for nutrient cycling in the soil/root interface. Because of the variations in brewing compost tea, it is better to examine the microbial content with a microscope and decide at what period of the brew you should apply it but if you do not have a microscope then use the CT between the time periods mentioned above for the desired effects. 

Extras   (when using extras you may wish to adjust amounts of other ingredients to avoid overload)

*pyrophyllite clay powder – 0.063% - (120 ml), (4 ounces), (0.5 cup)
This is a good ingredient to stimulate more bacteria/archaea diversity which seems to experimentally contribute to disease control. It can be found here at a reasonable price. http://www.continentalclay.com/detail.php?PID=695&cat_id=197&sub_categoryID=4 

*alfalfa meal – up to 0.25% (.5 liter or 500 ml), (17 ounces US), (0.5 quart US), (2 plus cups)
This promotes the growth of flagellates and amoebae and is also a fungal food. Just get the cheap stuff by the bag at the feed store, checking that it does not contain anti-microbials

*Canadian sphagnum peat moss Premier Brand – throw in a handful or two to promote flagellates and amoebae and/or fungal hyphae. Batches are inconsistent, so unless you have a microscope you won’t be sure which set of microbes it will promote but I have never seen anything bad.

B/ Fungal Dominant; 

*compost/vermicompost (fungal content) -  2.38% max. (4.5 liters), (19 cups US), (4.5 quarts US)

*unsulphured pure black strap molasses - 0.25% (475 ml rounded), (2 cups US), (0.5 quart US)  
NOTE: Also experiment with eliminating black strap molasses. Recent trials have shown that with some types of compost the fungi does better. If you have a microscope check it out for yourself.
NOTE: If you have activated your compost with oat flour I recommend NOT using molasses in addition to fish hydrolysate unless you are willing to brew for a longer period and best to have a microscope.

*fish hydrolysate(high quality) - 0.190% - (360 ml) (12 ounces) Do not use chemically deodorized liquid fish! You may experiment using slightly higher amounts.

*kelp meal - 0.25% max. (.5 liter or 500 ml), (17 ounces US), (0.5 quart US), (2 plus cups)
NOTE: This is a maximum amount of kelp and you can experiment using less.  This is using regular grade kelp meal for livestock. If you have soluble kelp, I recommend using smaller amounts. Sometimes kelp meal can initially delay bacterial multiplication.

*rock phosphate granules/powder - 0.063% - (120 ml), (4 ounces), (0.5 cup)
NOTE: We seem to get the same results using 100 ml of rock phosphate but experiment yourself. Sometimes we run the rock phosphate granules through the electric coffee grinder to get a fine powder.

Extras   (when using extras you may wish to adjust amounts of other ingredients to avoid overload)

* Humic acid - I am no longer recommending the use of  humic acid in compost tea, as I've not seen any benefits from doing so. Better to apply it directly to the soil.

*you could also add one of the Alaska ‘Humus’ products and/or Canadian sphagnum Premier brand at 0.25% or less. If there are fungi spores present in the substance, hyphae should grow.

*you may add a little soil or partially/completely decomposed forest litter (rotted leaves, wood pieces). If you are applying CT to grass or flowers use some local soil from a healthy (unmanipulated by man) area where similar plant species are doing well. If you are applying to deciduous trees or bushes then gather some soil or forest litter from a deciduous forest where the forest appears healthy and has that…you know… fabulous earthy odor. I recommend using 500 ml. (0.5 liter) or 2 cups to begin with and see how that works out. Careful to not use big chunks if using the Microbulator 50.

Length of Brew
Brew until fungal hyphae is observed with a microscope or for 18 to 24 hours. When using our fungal inhabited vermicompost, the optimum time seems to be 18 hours for a bacteria/archaea and fungal brew, however fungal hyphae is extracted at 10 hours with less bacteria/archaea present. If you want a fungal dominant brew this may be the best time to apply. For those of you with microscopes, check it out. This recipe, provided there are fungi spores in your compost, should produce a higher volume of fungal hyphae and reduced bacteria/archaea numbers. 

Wow that is detailed, i love it. As a biology student i like how they broke it down to the microbiology of the recipes. Thanks Jerilynn!

Alan, you should jump right into the discussions http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/compost_tea/, as a biology student you should find them informative .

sweet, yeah i'll check that out. I just mainly like when they break it down into the science because i feel more confident that its being backed up when they say it has more Nitrogen, or more beneficial microbes, etc.

chloramine won't gass off like chlorine will. if your using tap water i would bubble it first with some dirt, citric acid or some aquarium additive first to change it into chlorine which will then gass off. also there's no such thing as to much air, use at a minium 50 litres of air per minute pump. over at the hyperion sewage treatment plant in el segundo they have a huge room full of generators to make liquid oxygen to pump through their brew before they flush it out to sea. great to see tim wilson site promoted over here but i haven't seen him  or dr ingham post anything over here

Cool thanks for the Chloramine tip, I kept reading on other plant websites about leaving it out on the sun to gas off the chlorine, but maybe they had missing info. I look further into it.

Jerilynn Walton is your fungal hyphae mix a good fungicide? I know that the large bacterial populations and the keratinase created by the worm slime in the castings can act as a powerful insecticide.  

Alan, how long do you brew the mixture before applying it to your garden?

How would molasses help with the growing of plants?

Walker, the soil web experts can explain it better, but my understanding is that molasses can help feed certain microorganisms that are beneficial to the soil. If the soil ecosystem is healthy, the plants in that soil are more likely to thrive.

But it's not exactly simple. If you read the excerpt that Jerilynn posted above, you can see there is some debate among the experts as to when molasses is helpful or harmful. I think the general advice these days is to leave it out of compost tea brewing unless you know what you're doing.

RSS

Badge

Loading…

© 2014   Created by Steven Chow.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service